Nitesun HT12 Bullseye Mk2 rechargeable LED flashlight, 1,095 lumens, 927 metres – the ultimate game torch! Customer reviews

 

My regular customers know that I recommend torches with the traditional hot-spot-and-spill beam profile for security and general use because that's how our eyes work (central vision which sees detail and colour in good light, and peripheral vision that picks up shapes and movement in low light).

 

This kind of beam profile makes it easier to move about and spot things in the dark. It's the kind of torch used by uniformed forces all over the world, and it's the kind of beam you'll get from a torch with a reflector.

 

Torches with lenses instead of reflectors have little or no spill-beam. With a decent lens they may be able to throw their light further than a torch with a reflector, but it does feel a bit weird looking down a tunnel of light surrounded by a sea of blackness. You can usually adjust the width of the beam ("zoom") but you won't get a hot-spot-and-spill, just a wider and dimmer hot-spot (or hot-square!)

 

However there's one application where zoomers really come into their own – game watching! I'm told animals are not aware of light falling on themselves – what spooks them is when their surroundings are lit up – so a really narrow hot-spot with no spill-beam may be ideal for watching game from a distance.

 

And it's even better when that beam is red! It seems wildlife doesn't see red light at all, while our own night-vision is preserved by red light, so it's not surprising that torches with red beams are catching on in a big way at game reserves and among hunters. It's also worth knowing that an LED module that generates red light will deliver a far more intense and "pure" red beam than a white torch with a red filter.

 

Put it all together and it's blindingly obvious why my B158 Bullseye has become the go-to light for wildlife enthusiasts over the past two years. While chain-store zoomers cut corners to stay competitive (using no-name-brand LEDs, supermarket batteries and limited features) the Bullseye stands out as the exception to the rule, even before we talk about all the kit that's available to go with it.

 

The Bullseye is a true system light, with compatible accessories including red, green, UV and infra-red modules, rifle-mounts and remote switches, making it an easy choice for both hunters and nature lovers – you can read dozens of customer reviews for the B158 here.

 

And now (drum roll, please) Nitesun have launched an all-new version of the Bullseye with a host of big and small improvements – the HT12 Bullseye Mk2!

 

The biggest change is the massive 62mm polycarbonate lens – significantly larger than the 46mm lens on the old Bullseye (note that Nitesun call it the 66mm lens, but some of that width is hidden). If there's a bigger or more beautiful lens on any torch, I haven't seen it!

 

Coupled with a third generation XPL HI chip from Cree Inc., this lens extends the throw from just over 200 real-world metres to just under 300m (the first sample I tested delivered 215,000 candela, which translates to 927 ANSI metres or 293 real-world metres). Put another way, this is a beam angle of just two degrees, zooming out to 28 degrees which is perfect for walking around.


 


Like the previous model, the new HT12 Bullseye is supported by a full range of optional modules and accessories, which has now been expanded to include different sized lenses! The standard 62mm lens offers the greatest beam distance but may not fit on every rig, so I also stock an optional 46mm lens, which is the same diameter as the old Bullseye. There are also 36mm and 27.5mm lenses available to provide an even more compact profile.


 

Finally, the Bullseye now has a 25.4mm barrel which means it can be mounted on a rifle using a standard one-inch scope-mount. Also, in addition to the standard "momentary" remote pressure switch, Nitesun have developed a multi-function remote with a dimming function so you can ramp the light between max and min, as well as "click to turn on" so that the light stays on when you release pressure.
 

BTW, good news for owners of the original B158 Bullseye, I still have modules, mounts and remote pressure switches to fit your torches, even though the B158 itself is sold out.


 

As before, I'm offering the Bullseye in three "bundles" – the Security Bundle with the white module only, the Safari Bundle with white, red and UV, and the Sniper Bundle with the full-house of white, red, green, UV and 850nm IR together with the multi-function remote and a rail-mount.

 

The bundles in the drop-down pricelist above include high-capacity Li-Ions and chargers, but I'm happy to put together a package with any combination of components and accessories to suit your needs – and to give you a discount at the same time – just drop me a line!

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Nitesun HT12 Bullseye Mk2

R1,995.00

Nitesun HT12 Bullseye Mk2 rechargeable LED flashlight, 1,095 lumens, 927 metres – the ultimate game torch! Customer reviews
 
My regular customers know that I recommend torches with the traditional hot-spot-and-spill beam profile for security and general use because that's how our eyes work (central vision which sees detail and colour in good light, and peripheral vision that picks up shapes and movement in low light).
 
This kind of beam profile makes it easier to move about and spot things in the dark. It's the kind of torch used by uniformed forces all over the world, and it's the kind of beam you'll get from a torch with a reflector.
 
Torches with lenses instead of reflectors have little or no spill-beam. With a decent lens they may be able to throw their light further than a torch with a reflector, but it does feel a bit weird looking down a tunnel of light surrounded by a sea of blackness. You can usually adjust the width of the beam ("zoom") but you won't get a hot-spot-and-spill, just a wider and dimmer hot-spot (or hot-square!)
 
However there's one application where zoomers really come into their own – game watching! I'm told animals are not aware of light falling on themselves – what spooks them is when their surroundings are lit up – so a really narrow hot-spot with no spill-beam may be ideal for watching game from a distance.
 
And it's even better when that beam is red! It seems wildlife doesn't see red light at all, while our own night-vision is preserved by red light, so it's not surprising that torches with red beams are catching on in a big way at game reserves and among hunters. It's also worth knowing that an LED module that generates red light will deliver a far more intense and "pure" red beam than a white torch with a red filter.
 
Put it all together and it's blindingly obvious why my B158 Bullseye has become the go-to light for wildlife enthusiasts over the past two years. While chain-store zoomers cut corners to stay competitive (using no-name-brand LEDs, supermarket batteries and limited features) the Bullseye stands out as the exception to the rule, even before we talk about all the kit that's available to go with it.
 
The Bullseye is a true system light, with compatible accessories including red, green, UV and infra-red modules, rifle-mounts and remote switches, making it an easy choice for both hunters and nature lovers – you can read dozens of customer reviews for the B158 here.
 
And now (drum roll, please) Nitesun have launched an all-new version of the Bullseye with a host of big and small improvements – the HT12 Bullseye Mk2!
 
The biggest change is the massive 62mm polycarbonate lens – significantly larger than the 46mm lens on the old Bullseye (note that Nitesun call it the 66mm lens, but some of that width is hidden). If there's a bigger or more beautiful lens on any torch, I haven't seen it!
 
Coupled with a third generation XPL HI chip from Cree Inc., this lens extends the throw from just over 200 real-world metres to just under 300m (the first sample I tested delivered 215,000 candela, which translates to 927 ANSI metres or 293 real-world metres). Put another way, this is a beam angle of just two degrees, zooming out to 28 degrees which is perfect for walking around.
 
Like the previous model, the new HT12 Bullseye is supported by a full range of optional modules and accessories, which has now been expanded to include different sized lenses! The standard 62mm lens offers the greatest beam distance but may not fit on every rig, so I also stock an optional 46mm lens, which is the same diameter as the old Bullseye. There are also 36mm and 27.5mm lenses available to provide an even more compact profile.
 
Finally, the Bullseye now has a 25.4mm barrel which means it can be mounted on a rifle using a standard one-inch scope-mount. Also, in addition to the standard "momentary" remote pressure switch, Nitesun have developed a multi-function remote with a dimming function so you can ramp the light between max and min, as well as "click to turn on" so that the light stays on when you release pressure.
 
BTW, good news for owners of the original B158 Bullseye, I still have modules, mounts and remote pressure switches to fit your torches, even though the B158 itself is sold out.
 
As before, I'm offering the Bullseye in three "bundles" – the Security Bundle with the white module only, the Safari Bundle with white, red and UV, and the Sniper Bundle with the full-house of white, red, green, UV and 850nm IR together with the multi-function remote and a rail-mount.
 
The bundles in the drop-down pricelist above include high-capacity Li-Ions and chargers, but I'm happy to put together a package with any combination of components and accessories to suit your needs – and to give you a discount at the same time – just drop me a line!
Notify me when HT12 Bullseye Security Bundle with 3500mAh Li-Ion and Lii-100 USB charger/powerbank Nitesun HT12 Bullseye Mk2 is available.